Participants

Rina Agarwala

Rina Agarwala is Associate Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. Agarwala is the author of Informal Labor, Formal Politics and Dignified Discontent in India (Cambridge, 2013) and the co-editor (with Ron Herring) of Whatever Happened to Class? Reflections from South Asia (Routledge, 2008). She has published articles on informal labor, transnational movements, migration, legal justice, and gender. Currently, she is working on a book manuscript on migration and development, as well as a cross-country comparative project on informal workers’ movements in seven countries. Agarwala holds a BA in Economics and Government from Cornell University, an MPP in Political and Economic Development from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and a PhD. in demography and sociology from Princeton University.

Rina Agarwala

Kalaiyarasan Arumugam

Kalaiyarasan is faculty at the Madras Institute of Development Studies, Chennai. He did his Ph.D. in Development Economics from Jawaharlal Nehru University. He was previously a faculty at the National Institute of Labour Economics Research and Development, Planning Commission, Government of India. He works on caste, labour and industrialization and regional political economy in India. 

Kalaiyarasan Arumugam

John Echeverri-Gent

John Echeverri-Gent is author of The State and the Poor: Public Policy and Political Development in India and the United States and co-editor of Economic Reform in Three Giants: U.S. Foreign Policy and the USSR, China, and India. He has written many articles in comparative public policy and the political economy of development. His most recent publication is “Understanding India’s Response to the Global Financial Crisis: From Quick Rebound to Endless Slowdown?” in Unexpected Outcomes: The Quick Rebound of Emerging Powers from the Global Financial Crisis, Brookings, 2015. His current research projects are on “Economic Interdependence and Strategic Interest: China, India, and the United States in the New Global Order” and “The Political Economy of India’s Financial Sector Reform in Comparative Perspective.” He is a member of the editorial board of Political Science Quarterly. He has served as consultant to the World Bank and USAID. He was chair of the American Political Science Task Force on Difference and Inequality in Developing Societies and treasurer of the American Institute of Indian Studies. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in Political Science from the University of Chicago.

John Echeverri-Gent

Leela Fernandes

Leela Fernandes is the Glenda Dickerson Collegiate Professor of Women’s Studies and Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan. She is the author of India’s New Middle Class: Democratic Politics in an Era of Economic Reform; Transnational Feminism in the United States: Knowledge, Ethics, Power; Producing Workers: The Politics of Gender, Class, and Culture in the Calcutta Jute Mills; and Transforming Feminist Practice. She is currently writing a new book, India’s Liberalizing State: Urbanization, Inequality, and the Politics of Water. She has also published numerous essays and articles on questions of inequality, politics, and feminist theory and is the editor of Feminists Rethink the Neoliberal State and Handbook on Gender in South Asia.

Leela Fernandes

Ron Herring

Ron Herring is Professor Emeritus of Government and International Professor of Agriculture and Rural Development at Cornell University, previously Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University. At Cornell he served as Chair of Government and Director of the Einaudi Center for International Studies as the John S. Knight Professor of International Relations, among other jobs. His most recent major work was as Editor of the Oxford Handbook of Food, Politics and Society (2015). His most recent publications are ‘The End of the GMO? Genome Editing, Gene Drives and New Frontiers of Plant Technology.’ With K. Hefferon. Review of Agrarian Studies. 7: 2 2017; “Politics of Biotechnology: What Can We Learn from India about Ideas, Interests and Outcomes?” in N. Chandrasekhara Rao, Carl Pray and Ronald Herring, Ed Biotechnology for a Second Green Revolution in India. Academic Foundation. New Delhi. 2018. Ron is now writing (slowly) a book entitled Suicide Seeds and Silver Bullets: ‘GMOs’ from the Ground Up. Most exciting, challenging and fulfilling job was creating and teaching with a team of natural scientists a MOOC on the EdX/CornellX platform: The Science and Politics of the GMO, enrolling students in over 144 countries (2016 Fall, 2017 Spring). https://www.edx.org/course/science-politics-gmo-cornellx-gmo0101x  Website: http://government.arts.cornell.edu/faculty/herring/

Ronald Herring

Frank Hoeber

Francis W. “Frank” Hoeber is a historian and writer working in Philadelphia.  His book, Against Time: Letters from Nazi Germany, 1938-1939, (Philadelphia, American Philosophical Society, 2015) documents the flight of his parents, Johannes and Elfriede Hoeber, from Nazi Germany with their 9-year-old daughter, Susanne.  Frank’s German translation of this book is forthcoming from German Resistance Memorial Foundation (Gedenkstätte Deutscher Widerstand) and Lukas Verlag in Berlin.

Following the death of Susanne Hoeber Rudolph and Lloyd I. Rudolph at the end of 2015, Frank carried out their request to complete and edit their last book, Romanticism’s Child:  An Intellectual History of James Tod’s Influence on Indian History and Historiography (Delhi, Oxford University Press, 2016).

Previously, Frank spent nearly 45 years in public service.  He was an executive in the headquarters of the New Jersey Judiciary in Trenton and published numerous articles on court management.  Previously he managed all investigations in the Philadelphia office of the National Labor Relations Board.  He was a contributor to Cox, Bok and Gorman’s Cases and Materials on Labor Law (Foundation Press, 1986).

Frank is a graduate of Columbia University and has an M.A. in history from Temple University.

Frank Hoeber

Christophe Jaffrelot

Dr. Christophe Jaffrelot is Senior research fellow at CERI-Sciences Po/CNRS, and Professor of Indian Politics and Sociology at the King’s India Institute (London). Among his publications are The Hindu nationalist movement and Indian politics, 1925 to 1990s, New Delhi, Penguin, 1999, India’s Silent Revolution, New Delhi, Permanent Black, 2003 and The Pakistan Paradox. Instability and Resilience, New Delhi, Random House, 2015.  

Christophe Jaffrelot

Niraja Gopal Jayal

Niraja Gopal Jayal is Professor at the Centre for the Study of Law and Governance at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Her book Citizenship and Its Discontents (Harvard University Press, 2013) won the Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy Prize of the Association of Asian Studies in 2015. She is also the author of Representing India: Ethnic Diversity and the Governance of Public Institutions (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006) and Democracy and the State: Welfare, Secularism and Development in Contemporary India (OUP, 1999). She has co-edited The Oxford Companion to Politics in India, and is the editor/co-editor of, among others, Democracy in India (OUP, 2001) and Local Governance in India: Decentralisation and Beyond (OUP 2005). She is currently working on a book on the decline of the public university in India. She has held visiting appointments at, among others, King’s College, London; the EHESS, Paris; Princeton University; and the University of Melbourne. In 2009, she delivered the Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures at All Souls College, Oxford. She was Vice-President of the American Political Science Association in 2011-12.

Via Skype

Professor Niraja Gopal Jayal

Rob Jenkins

Rob Jenkins is Professor of Political Science at Hunter College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York. His research has focused on Indian politics, including work on the political economy of reform, anti-corruption activism, and rights-based development initiatives.  His most recent books are a monograph (coauthored with James Manor), Politics and the Right to Work: India’s National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (OUP, 2017), and a collection of essays (co-edited with Loraine Kennedy and Partha Mukhopadhyay), Power, Policy and Protest: The Politics of India’s Special Economic Zones (OUP, 2014).  He has also published on various aspects of post-conflict peacebuilding, including a monograph, Peacebuilding: From Concept to Commission (Routledge, 2013). Further details available at: http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/polsci/faculty/Jenkins

Via Skype

Rob Jenkins

Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner

Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner is an Assistant Professor of Politics & Global Studies at the University of Virginia. Prior to joining UVA, she was an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, and an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Boston College. She received a Ph.D. in Political Science and Masters in International Development & Regional Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a B.A. in Sociology/Anthropology from Swarthmore College.

Gabi’s research is focused on local citizen-state relations and their consequences for human development and social welfare, with a regional focus on India. A first body of recently completed work (appearing in the journals World Politics and World Development) investigates the conditions under and pathways through which citizens make claims on the state for essential services. Her book, Claiming the State: Active Citizenship & Social Welfare in Rural India, will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2018. A second body of work-in-progress examines strategies to increase official accountability and to mobilize more effective citizen action. Current research includes studies of citizen-police relations, grievance redressal, and citizen journalism in India. Her research has been supported by the Fulbright Program, the National Science Foundation, and the Boren Fellowship, and DFID’s Economic Development and Institutions program. Gabi has also worked in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa on issues related to economic and social rights, service delivery, disaster risk reduction, environmental sustainability, and local politics.

Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner

Kristen Renwick Monroe

Kristen Renwick Monroe is Chancellor’s Professor of Political Science at UC Irvine where she founded and now directs the UCI Interdisciplinary Center for the Scientific Study of Ethics & Morality. Educated at Smith College, the University of Chicago and post-doctoral work in econometrics at the University of British Columbia, Monroe has taught at SUNY Stony Brook, NYU, Princeton, Harvard, and UCI.

            Monroe has published four prize-winning books (The Heart of Altruism, The Hand of Compassion, Ethics in an Age of Terror and Genocide, and A Darkling Plain: Stories of Conflict and Humanity during War), plus 14 additional books and over 100 chapters/articles. She was elected president of the International Society of Political Psychology, vice-president of both the American and the Midwest Political Science Associations, and is the recipient of several lifetime achievement awards (Pool, Goodnow from APSA, Knutson, Sanford from the ISPP, Silverman from UCI), mentoring awards (3 from APSA, UCI) and has been a Rockefeller, Killam, Woodrow Wilson, LaVerne Noyes, and Earhart Fellow. Her most recent honor is the Berlin Prize, awarded by the American Academy in Berlin.

While she retains her interest in political economy and methodology, most of Monroe’s recent work locates at the intersection of ethics, political psychology and international relations. Monroe’s most recent work is Ethics and Economics (with Kenneth Arrow), a forthcoming book (The Evils of Polygyny, with Rose McDermott) and an article in Perspectives on Politics (“DA-RT and the Rush to Transparency”). She is currently working on a book of essays on ethics (Chloe and Nicole and the Elephant in the Parlor), a book on gender inequality in academia (Empowering Women), one on the ethics/politics of discrimination (Trudi: Aging and the Limits of Empathy for Human Compassion), one on moral courage (Moral Courage in an Age of Confusion and Despair), and one on the process by which democracy disintegrates (“I was there!” Refugees from the Third Reich and the Psychological Process Accompanying Political Trauma and the Demise of Democracy). She is editing the second of the David Easton Lectures (Marginalization, Diversity and Inclusion in Political Science) and will use her time at the American Academy in Berlin (Spring 2018) to edit her father’s letters, beginning in WWII and ending with his experience after the war as the American on the British High Commission on War Crimes (An Ugly War, A Young Man, So Far from Home).

Kristen Renwick Monroe

Kamal Sadiq

Kamal Sadiq (Ph.D, The University of Chicago) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, University of California, Irvine. He specializes in Citizenship; Immigration; and Urbanization in Developing Countries. His regional expertise is in South Asia (India, Bangladesh) and Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Indonesia). He is fluent in English, Hindi (India), Urdu (India) and competent in Bahasa Indonesia/Malaysia.

He is the author of Paper Citizens: How Illegal Immigrants Acquire Citizenship in Developing Countries (New York: Oxford University Press, hardcover 2009, paperback 2010). His articles have appeared in journals such as the International Studies Quarterly, Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, Asian Perspectives, and in edited books. His most recent publications are “Postcolonial Citizenship,” chapter 9 in Ayelet Shachar et al (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Citizenship (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017) and a chapter on the “Limits of Legal Citizenship: Narratives from South and Southeast Asia,” in Benjamin N. Lawrance and Jacqueline Stevens (eds.), Citizenship in Question: Evidentiary Birthright and Statelessness (Durham: Duke University Press, 2017).

He recently served as the Chair of the Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Migration section (ENMISA) of the ISA (2013-2015) and as the Co-President of the Migration and Citizenship section of the APSA (2015-2017). He serves on the editorial board of the journal Citizenship Studies.

Kamal Sadiq

Vivien A. Schmidt

Vivien A. Schmidt is Jean Monnet Professor of European Integration and Professor of International Relations and Political Science in the Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University, and Founding Director of BU’s Center for the Study of Europe.  Professor Schmidt has published widely in European political economy, institutions and democracy, as well as on neo-institutional theory (discursive institutionalism), with twelve books and over 200 chapters in books and articles in journals.  Recent books include The Futures of European Capitalism (Oxford, 2002), Democracy in Europe: The EU and National Polities (Oxford, 2006), named in 2015 by the European Parliament as one of the ‘100 Books on Europe to Remember,’ Resilient Liberalism in Europe’s Political Economy (Cambridge, co-edited with M. Thatcher, 2013), and the forthcoming Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy:  Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers in the Eurozone (Oxford). 

Via Skype

Vivien A. Schmidt

Aseema Sinha

Dr. Aseema Sinha is the Wagener Chair of South Asian Politics and George R. Roberts Fellow at Claremont McKenna College. She previously taught at University of Wisconsin-Madison and was a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center in DCHer research interests relate to political economy of India, India-China comparisons, International Organizations, and the rise of India as an emerging power.  She teaches courses on South Asia, Social Movements, Globalization and Developing Countries, and on Comparative Politics.  She will begin teaching in the Philosophy, Politics, Economics (PPE) major at CMC in Fall 2016. She has authored a book, The Regional Roots of Developmental Politics in India: A Divided Leviathan(Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2005), which received the Joseph Elder Book Prize in the Indian Social Sciences.  She is also an author of journal articles on trade policy, federalism, subnational comparisons in India, India and China, business collective action in India, and public expenditure across Indian states.  Her articles have appeared in the British Journal of Political Science, World Development, Polity, Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Politics, Business and Politics, Journal of Democracy, and India Review.  Her latest book titled, Globalizing India:How Global  Rules and Markets are Shaping India's Rise to Power was published by Cambridge University Press (2016). She has recently published, Scaling Up: Beyond the Subnational Comparative Method for India, Studies in Indian Politics, June 2015, and Gregory Shaffer, James Nedumpara, and Aseema Sinha, “State Transformation and the Rise of Lawyers: The WTO, India, and Transnational Legal Ordering,” Law and Society Review, Vol. 49, Issue 3, September 2015.

Aseema Sinha

Emmanuel Teitelbaum

Emmanuel Teitelbaum is Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University, where he teaches courses on comparative politics. His writings examine class politics and political violence.  His academic articles have appeared in leading journals including American Journal of Political Science, World Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Political Research Quarterly, PS: Political Science & Politics, the Journal of Development Studies and Critical Asian Studies.  His book, Managing Dissent: Democracy and Industrial Conflict in Post-Reform South Asia (Cornell University Press), explores the dynamics of state-labor relations and industrial conflict following the implementation of neoliberal economic reforms in India and Sri Lanka.  Professor Teitelbaum’s research has received support from the United States Institute of Peace, the National Science Foundation, the Fulbright Foundation and the Social Science Research Council.  He was the recipient of the 2007 Gabriel Almond Award for Best Dissertation in Comparative Politics.  He holds a Ph.D. from Cornell University and a B.A. from John Carroll University.

Teitelbaum

Denise Walsh

Denise Walsh is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Politics and Women, Gender & Sexuality at the University of Virginia, and a founding co-director of the Power, Violence and Inequality Collective in the College of Arts & Sciences at UVA. Her research investigates how liberal democracies can become more inclusive and just. Walsh’s current book manuscript, The Politics of Culture and Women’s Rights in Liberal Democracies, examines polygyny in South Africa, the expulsion of indigenous women from the tribe for marrying non-native men in Canada, and the face veil ban in France. Walsh also is a co-founder of The Backlash Project, which investigates opposition to gender justice.

Walsh’s first book, Women’s Rights in Democratizing States (Cambridge University Press, 2010) compares women’s rights in South Africa, Poland, and Chile. Walsh finds that democratic institutions like political parties and social movements often obstruct advances in women’s rights during transitions to democracy. Walsh’s research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, USAID, the Collegio Carlo Alberto in Italy, the Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth College, and many organizations at the University of Virginia. Walsh received an all-University Teaching Award in 2014 and teaches courses on identity politics; power, violence and inequality in the global South; gender politics in comparative perspective and in Africa; human rights; feminist theory; gender and the public sphere; and gender-based violence.

Denise Walsh

Steven I. Wilkinson

Steven I. Wilkinson is Nilekani Professor of India and South Asian Studies and Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at Yale University, where he is also Chair of the Political Science department. He works on the causes of ethnic violence, and his book, Votes and Violence: electoral competition and ethnic riots in India (Cambridge, 2004), examines the political roots of communal conflict in South Asia. He is also interested in corruption in politics, and co-edited the book Patrons, Clients or Politics: Patterns of Political Accountability and Competition (Cambridge, 2007) with Herbert Kitschelt. His most recent book is Army and Nation, which came out in January 2015 from Harvard University Press (Permanent Black in South Asia), and examines India’s success in managing the imbalanced colonial army it inherited in 1947. He is currently working with Saumitra Jha (Stanford GSB) on a book on War and Political Change, the first part of which, on the role of veterans in the partition of India, was published in article form in the American Political Science Review. The next part of this project looks at the role of returned veterans from the American war of Independence in the French Revolution.

Wilkinson