1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Henry J. Abraham

Professor Emeritus American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Gerard Alexander

Associate Professor; Director of the Honors Program

Ph.D., Columbia

Comparative Politics
(434) 924-3978 S285

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T 1:15-3:15

Tags:Area: Europe, Democratic Theory, Honors program, Political Development and Democratization

 My research began with a focus on the conditions of democratic consolidation in advanced industrial countries, especially in Western Europe. My first book -- The Sources of Democratic Consolidation (Cornell University Press, 2002) -- argued that the key right-of-center political movements formed long-term commitments to democracy only when their political risks in democracy became relatively low as left agendas moderated across time. Variation in these risks was used to explain variation in conservative regime preferences and in regime outcomes in Europe's five largest countries from the 1870's France to 1980's Spain. This first research project also included two articles with related but distinct arguments. In the Journal of Theoretical Politics (2001), I argued that formal political institutions in democracy cannot create the degree of predictability needed for consolidation. In Comparative Political Studies (2002), I argue that non-formal social-structural characteristic of countries are more important causes of regime outcomes than the formal regime characteristics emphasized in prominent claims concerning the rule of law and “institutionalized uncertainty.” Related reasoning is the basis of an article in The National Interest, “The Authoritarian Illusion” (2004). My current research concerns factors affecting the size and role of government in selected cases in Western Europe and also the United States, and how they influence conservative attempts at reform of welfare states.

Sarah Andrews

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Emma Ashford

International Relations
703-937-7989

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Dissertation title: "Crude Power: The Foreign Policy of Oil-Exporting States."

Committee: Allen Lynch (chair), Dale Copeland and David Waldner

Lawrie Balfour

Professor and Interim Chair

Ph.D., Princeton

Political Theory
(434) 924-4631 S395

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

W 1-3

Tags:Democratic Theory, Gender, Justice and Political Ethics, Race and Ethnicity

Lawrie Balfour is the author of Democracy’s Reconstruction: Thinking Politically with W. E. B. Du Bois (Oxford University Press) and The Evidence of Things Not Said: James Baldwin and the Promise of American Democracy (Cornell University Press). Her articles on race and democratic theory have appeared in Political Theory, American Political Science Review, Hypatia, The Du Bois Review, The Review of Politics, and edited collections. She is now working on a book project on reparations for slavery and Jim Crow. Balfour has held fellowships from the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for Afro-American Research, the Center for the Study of Values in Public Life at Harvard Divinity School, the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. A recipient of multiple teaching awards, she was Laurence S. Rockefeller Visiting Associate Professor for Distinguished Teaching at Princeton University in 2008-2009 and a visiting faculty member at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris in May 2012. She was a member of the Journal of Politics editorial board from 2005-07 and 2009-11 and currently serves on the board of Politics, Groups, and Identities. Balfour was Director of Fellowships at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American and African Studies from 2011-2013. She is serving as Interim Chair of Politics from January 2014-January 2015.

Regev Ben Jacob

Political Theory

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Colin Bird

Associate Professor

Ph.D., Columbia

Political Theory
(434) 924-3615 S495

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

W 10-12

Tags:Democratic Theory, History of Political Thought, Honors program, International Political Theory, Justice and Political Ethics, Law Courts and Legal Theory

Colin Bird is Associate Professor of Politics and Director of the Program in Political Philosophy, Policy and Law at the University of Virginia. His research interests include: the nature of individualism; questioning the identity and character of a 'liberal' tradition of political thought; the coherence of contemporary libertarianism; concepts of freedom; the nature of toleration and respect; the political relevance of ideals of self-respect; democratic theory and the notion of self-government; notions of state neutrality and 'public justification'; the concept of dignity; ideals of fraternity; the role of ordinary language in political analysis; and the explication of the distinction between a political 'left' and a political 'right'.

His work has appeared in such journals as Ethics, Political Theory, The American Political Science Review, Philosophy and Public Affairs, and The European Journal of Philosophy. He is the author of two books, both published by Cambridge University Press: The Myth of Liberal Individualism (1999) and An Introduction to Political Philosophy (2006). He is currently completing a further book tentatively entitled:'After Respect: a Critique of Dignitarian Humanism.

In 2001-2 Bird was a Laurance S. Rockefeller visiting fellow at the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University, and in 2008-9 an NEH Fellow at the National Humanities Center in North Carolina.

Deborah Boucoyannis

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., University of Chicago

Comparative Politics
(434) 982-2022 S264

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

W 3-5

Tags:Political Development and Democratization, Political Institutions, Politics and History

Deborah Boucoyannis is Assistant Professor of Politics, specializing in comparative politics. She also works on the historical and theoretical foundations of liberalism, especially as it applies to the related fields of political economy and international relations. She is currently working on a book manuscript that takes a historical approach to a contemporary question: How do liberal regimes emerge, and what are the preconditions to state building? She focuses on the constitutive role of courts and systems of law, as opposed to geopolitical or economic explanations. The manuscript is based on a dissertation that received the APSA Ernst Haas Best Dissertation Award in European Politics and the Seymour Martin Lipset Best Dissertation Award from the Society for Comparative Research.

Her work on the political theory/economy of early liberalism includes a paper on Adam Smith, published in Perspectives on Politics.  The paper posits that Smith's system does not predict the inequalities that are widely believed to flow inevitably from the market economy.  Her paper on liberalism and the balance of power appeared in Perspectives on Politics. Her Ph.D. is from the University of Chicago. Prior to coming to Virginia, she was a predoctoral fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University and a Lecturer in the Committee on Social Studies at Harvard, where she received the Barrington Moore Award for Excellence in Advising and multiple teaching awards.

Bonnie Bragg


James W. Ceaser

Harry F. Byrd Professor of Politics American Politics
(434) 924-7903 S153

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M T 2-3:30

Tags:American Political Thought, Campaigns and Elections, Political Institutions

James W. Ceaser is Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia, where he has taught since 1976. He has written several books on American politics and political thought, including Presidential Selection, Liberal Democracy and Political Science, Reconstructing America, and Nature and History in American Political Development. Professor Ceaser has held visiting professorships at the University of Florence, the University of Basel, Oxford University, the University of Bordeaux, and the University of Rennes. Professor Ceaser is a frequent contributor to the popular press, and he often comments on American Politics for the Voice of America.

Andrew Clarke

American Politics

Gibson Hall 1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

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Carrie Coberly

BA, Cornell University

MA, Harvard University

Comparative Politics

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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I am interested in studying concepts of state capacity and institutional strength in the contemporary context, in particular the intersection of democratization and state-building in the greater Middle East.  Prior to pursuing a PhD in Politics, I served for 11 years as a Foreign Service Officer working on Iran and Afghanistan and four years working on Capitol Hill for Senator Ted Kennedy and Rep. Jane Harman.

Dale Copeland

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of Chicago

International Relations
(434) 924-6930 S485

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

W 2:15-4:30

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Field: International Relations Theory (security studies and international political economy). Author of The Origins of Major War, (Cornell U.P., Cornell Studies in Security Affairs, 2000), a study of the link between the rise and decline of great powers and the outbreak of devastating system-wide wars. Second book project, Economic Interdependence and International Conflict, examines the conditions under which inter-state trade will lead to either war or peace. Other research interests include the origins of economic interdependence between great powers, the realist-constructivist divide, in-group/out-group theory and the logic of reputation-building, and the interconnection between international political economy and security studies. Recent articles include: "The Constructivist Challenge to Structural Realism" (International Security, Fall 2000); "Economic Interdependence and War" (International Security, Spring 1996); "Trade Expectations and the Outbreak of Peace" (Security Studies, Autumn 1999/Winter 2000). Recipient of numerous awards, including MacArthur and Mellon Fellowships and a post-doctoral fellowship at the Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University.

Martha Derthick

Professor Emeritus American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Anita Dodds

Assistant to the Chair and Financial Assistant
(434) 924-6942 S165

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Administrative assistant to the chair including taking calls, keeping calendar, making arrangements for departments visitors; also department outreach and fund raising activities, expense reimbursements and financial reconciliations for faculty, and administration of promotion and tenure.

John Echeverri-Gent

Associate Professor; Director of Undergraduate Studies

Ph.D., University of Chicago

Comparative Politics
(434) 924-3968 S462

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T 6-7 W 4-6

Tags:Area: Asia, Honors program, Methods: Qualitative, NGOs and Civil Society, Political Development and Democratization, Political Economy, Political Institutions, Politics and History, Public Policy

John Echeverri-Gent's books include The State and the Poor: Public Policy and Political Development in India and the United States (University of California Press, 1993) and Economic Reform in Three Giants: U.S. Foreign Policy and the USSR, China, and India (Transaction, 1990) which he co-edited. His published articles focus on the political economy of development and comparative public policy. His currently completing a manuscript entitled “Politics of Markets: Political Economy of India’s Financial Market Development in Comparative Perspective”.   He serves as treasurer of the American Institute of Indian Studies and as a member of the editorial board of Political Science Quarterly.  He has chaired the American Political Science Task Force on “Difference and Inequality in Developing Societies.” He is the winner of the 1993 Theodore J. Lowi Award presented by the Policy Studies Organization for best article in the Policy Studies Journal. He has also served as MacArthur Scholar in residence at the Overseas Development Council, Senior Fellow at the American Institute of Indian Studies, and Fulbright Scholar.

Karen Farrell

International Relations

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Robert Fatton, Jr.

Julia A. Cooper Professor of Government and Foreign Affairs

Ph.D., Notre Dame

Comparative Politics
(434) 924-3663 S496

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M 10:30-12:30

Tags:African American Political Thought, Area: Africa, Honors program, Political Development and Democratization, Race and Ethnicity

Robert Fatton Jr. is the Julia A. Cooper Professor of Government and Foreign Affairs in the Department of Politics at the University of Virginia.  He also served as Chair of the Department of Politics from 1997 to 2004; and Associate-Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Virginia from 2010 to 2012.  He is the author of several books and a large number of scholarly articles.  His publications include: Black Consciousness in South Africa (1986); The Making of a Liberal Democracy: Senegal's Passive Revolution, 1975-1985 (1987); Predatory Rule: State and Civil Society in Africa (1992); Haiti's Predatory Republic: The Unending Transition to Democracy (2002); The Roots of Haitian Despotism (2007); and Haiti: Trapped in the Outer Periphery (2014).  He is also co-editor with R. K. Ramazani of The Future of Liberal Democracy:  Thomas Jefferson and the Contemporary World (2004); and Religion, State, and Society (2009).  He is the recipient of the 2011 “Award for Excellence” of the Haitian Studies Association for his “commitment and contribution to the emerging field of Haitian Studies for close to a quarter of a century.

Paul Freedman

Associate Professor, Associate Chair

Ph.D., University of Michigan

American Politics, Political Methodology
(434) 924-1372 S491

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T 1-3

Tags:Campaigns and Elections, Media and Political Communication, Methods: Experimental, Methods: Quantitative, Political Behavior and Public Opinion, Political Psychology, Public Policy, Representation

Paul Freedman (Ph.D. University of Michigan) is Associate Professor in the Department of Politics at the University of Virginia, where he serves as Associate Department Chair. Freedman teaches courses in public opinion, media and politics, voting behavior, research methods and the politics of food. He is a founding member of the UVA Food Collaborative, the recipient of the University of Virginia Alumni Board of Trustees Teaching Award, and served as the first Edward L. Ayers Advising Fellow. Freedman is co-author of Campaign Advertising and American Democracy (Temple University Press), and his work has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, Political Communication, Campaigns and Elections, Hedgehog Review, and Slate. Freedman served as research director for the Pew Project on Campaign Conduct at the Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership, and was a senior scholar at the Pew Partnership for Civic Change. Freedman currently serves as Academic Director of the Morven Summer Institute, is on the board of the Jefferson Institute, and is a senior scholar at the UVA Center for Politics. Since 2000, Freedman has been an election analyst for ABC News in New York.

Peter Furia

Lecturer and Director of Global Studies-Security and Justice

Ph.D., Princeton

International Relations
(434) 924-1438 S295

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M 1:30-3:15

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Much of Peter Furia's research addresses public opinion and comparative foreign policy and utilizes survey data to test claims about group identity and inter-group enmity in international relations. His other interests include mass-elite relations in democracies, the patriotism-cosmopolitanism debate and the history of international political thought. His research articles have appeared in Global Society, International Interactions, International Studies Quarterly and Polity and he has also published over a dozen book chapters, book reviews and shorter articles. He is co-editor (with Richard Sobel and Bethany Barratt) of Public Opinion and International Intervention: Lessons from the Iraq War (Potomac 2012).

Andew Gates

Political Theory

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Chelsea German

International Relations

Gibson Hall 1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

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Daniel Gingerich

Associate Professor and Director of the Quantitative Collaborative

Ph.D., Harvard

Comparative Politics, Political Methodology
(434) 243-4923 S254

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M 9:45-10:45

Tags:Area: Latin America, Methods: Quantitative, Political Development and Democratization, Political Economy, Political Institutions

Daniel W. Gingerich is Associate Professor of Politics specializing in comparative politics. His research focuses on understanding the causes and consequences of corruption and clientelism in Latin America as well as developing new methodologies to study these phenomena.  Gingerich has published articles in journals such as Political Analysis, the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, the British Journal of Political Science, Economics and Politics, and the Journal of Theoretical Politics. He is the author of Political Institutions and Party-Directed Corruption in South America: Stealing for the Team, published by Cambridge University Press as a title in the Political Economy of Institutions and Decisions series.  In dissertation form, this work was given the 2007 Leonard D. White Award by the American Political Science Association for the best dissertation in the field of public administration. Gingerich is also the sole principal investigator on a large scale, NSF funded project entitled “Can Institutions Cure Clientelism? Assessing the Impact of the Australian Ballot in Brazil.” (SES-1119908). This project provides a rigorous examination of how the transition from the nominal to effective secret vote shapes the nature of political representation by focusing on the historical experience of Brazil before and after the Australian Ballot (AB) was introduced in this county. Prior to coming to Virginia, Gingerich held a fellowship at Princeton's Center for the Study of Democratic Politics.  During the 2012-2013 academic year, he was a Visiting Scholar in the Research Department of the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, DC.

Book:

Political Institutions and Party-Directed Corruption in South America: Stealing for the Team. 2013. Cambridge University Press (Political Economy of Institutions and Decisions).

Articles:

Brokered Politics in Brazil: An Empirical Analysis. Forthcoming in the Quarterly Journal of Political Science.

Yesterday's Heroes, Today's Villains: Ideology, Corruption, and Democratic Performance. 2014. Journal of Theoretical Politics 26 (2): 249-282.

The Endurance and Eclipse of the Controlled Vote: A Formal Model of Vote Brokerage under the Secret Ballot (co-authored with Luis F. Medina) 2013. Economics and Politics 25 (3): 453-480.

Governance Indicators and the Level of Analysis Problem: Empirical Findings from South America. 2013. British Journal of Political Science 43 (3): 505-540.

Understanding Off-the-Books Politics: Conducting Inference on the Determinants of Sensitive Behavior with Randomized Response Surveys. 2010. Political Analysis 18: 349-380.

Corruption and Political Decay: Evidence from Bolivia. 2009. Quarterly Journal of Political Science 4 (1): 1-34.

Ballot Structure, Political Corruption, and the Performance of Proportional Representation. 2009. Journal of Theoretical Politics 21 (4): 1-33. Reprinted in Michael Johnston, ed. Public Sector Corruption (Sage, 2010).

Varieties of Capitalism and Institutional Complementarities in the Macroeconomy: An Empirical Assessment.” (co-authored with Peter Hall) 2009. British Journal of Political Science 39: 449-482. Reprinted in Bob Hanké, ed. Debating Varieties of Capitalism: A Reader (Oxford University Press, 2009).

Chapters in edited volumes: 

Bolivia: Traditional Parties, the State, and the Toll of Corruption. 2010. In Charles Blake and Steven Morris, eds., Corruption and Politics in Latin America: National and Regional Dynamics. Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 55-88.

Working Papers:  

Can Institutions Cure Clientelism? Assessing the Impact of the Australian Ballot in Brazil.

When to Protect?  Integrating Protected and Direct Responses in Surveys of Sensitive Behavior.

 

Chelsea Goforth

American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Geoff Gordon

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Thomas Gray


Robert Hamilton

International Relations
(571) 229-6334

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Harry Harding

University Professor and Professor of Public Policy

Ph.D., Stanford

Comparative Politics, International Relations
(434) 924-0812

Garrett Hall

235 McCormick Rd.

Office Hours:

By Appointment

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A specialist on Asia and American relations with Asia, Harry Harding’s major publications include The India-China Relationship: What the United States Needs to Know (co-edited with Francine Frankel, 2004); A Fragile Relationship: The United States and China Since 1972 (1992), Sino-American Relations, 1945-1955: A Joint Reassessment of a Critical Decade (co-edited with Yuan Ming, 1989), China's Second Revolution: Reform After Mao (1987), China’s Foreign Relations in the 1980s (editor, 1984), and Organizing China: The Problem of Bureaucracy, 1949-1976 (1981).

 

From 2009 to 2014, Harding served as the founding dean of the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy at the University of Virginia.  Upon leaving the deanship, he was appointed a University Professor and Professor of Public Policy.  Before coming to Virginia, he was a member of the faculties of Swarthmore College and Stanford University, a Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution, Dean of the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University, Director of Research and Analysis at Eurasia Group, and University Professor of International Affairs at George Washington University, and held visiting professorships at Georgetown University, the University of Washington, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and the University of Hong Kong.

Harding presently serves as a member of the Board of Governors of the Rajaratnam School of International Studies (Singapore), and a member of the Board of Directors of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations.    His previous positions include membership on the Senior Advisory Panel that advised the Asian Development Bank on its Long Term Strategic Framework in2000-01, the Scientific Advisory Board of the Finnish Institute of International Affairs, and the U.S. Defense Policy Board.  He has also served as a Trustee and Vice-Chairman of the Asia Foundation.

 

Boris Heersink


Daniel Henry

BA, Macalester College

MA, University of Chicago

Political Theory
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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Of what importance is ‘sympathy’ for the study of politics, and how should it be conceptualized? What role should this sentiment play in relations between political elites and those they represent? How does sympathy figure into one’s relation to other groups? The work of W.E.B. Du Bois offers complex, unexplored answers to these questions, arising from the political urgency and seemingly intractable rift of the “color line.” I argue that sympathy is a dominant, unifying theme in Du Bois’s work with significant, surprising implications for his understanding of the proper relationship between leaders and those they represent; social harmony between groups; the moral life of the political actor; and for the social and cultural advancement of American society as a whole. While my interpretation of Du Bois’s account will form the bulk of my research, I will also highlight its distinctiveness in contrast to other compelling theories of sympathy, notably those of Adam Smith, David Hume, and (in a different way) Hegel.

 

Roger Herbert

International Relations

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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April Herlevi

International Relations

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

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Frederick P. Hitz

Visiting Lecturer

J.D. Harvard

International Relations
Garrett Hall L046

1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T 2-3:30

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 Fred Hitz is a Senior Fellow at the Center for National Security law. Since 1998 he has been lecturing at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University and at the University of Virginia School of Law. He also teaches courses at the Jefferson Institute of Lifelong Learning at the University of Virginia. A graduate of Harvard Law School, he entered the Career Training Program at the CIA and served in the clandestine service in Africa. In 1974, he returned to law practice but re-entered government service in congressional liaison capacities with the State, Defense, and Energy departments before resuming his career at the CIA in 1978 as Legislative Counsel to the Director of Central Intelligence. Hitz was responsible for managing the Agency's response to the Intelligence Charters legislation that came out of the Church Committee hearings in 1976. In 1980, he became Deputy Director for Europe in the Directorate of Operations. Hitz was appointed the first statutory Inspector General of CIA by President George H.W. Bush. He served in that capacity from 1990-1998 when he retired. Among the many investigations he led at the CIA was the Aldrich Ames betrayal. He has written extensively about espionage and intelligence issues including The Great Game: the Myths and Reality of Espionage (Knopf, 2004). Professor Hitz's fascinating new book Why Spy: Espionage in an Age of Uncertainty was published in 2008. View Professor Hitz's presentation "A Short History of the Business of Intelligence" delivered at the Miller Center in October 2008 (video).

Matthew Holden

Henry L. and Grace M. Doherty Professor Emeritus of Politics

Ph.D., Northwestern

American Politics
601-952-0596

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Henry L. and Grace M. Doherty Professor Emeritus of Politics. Taught at the University of Virginia from 1981 through 2002 . (Previously taught at University of Pittsburgh, University of Wisconsin, and Wayne State University.)

Field: Public Administration/Public Policy.

Primary professional identification is with executive politics and public administration and with public policy, especially on energy and on environment. Author of Continuity and Disruption: Essays in Public Administration and other books and papers in public administration/public policy; politics and law; urban politics; ethnicity and race relations; decision-making; and methodology.

Former President, American Political Science Association. Former President of the Policy Studies Organization. Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. L.L.D. (Hon.), Tuskegee University; L. H. D. (Hon.), Virginia Theological Seminary.

Pi-Cheng (Carl) Huang

BA, National Chengchi University

International Relations
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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My research interests focus primarily on how some regions are able to cease hostilities and enter more peaceful and cooperative relations while others find themselves trapped in the entangling historical animosities and disputes. In particular, I am interested in the comparative regional security developments in postwar Europe and East Asia.
 

Adam G. Hughes

American Politics
(801) 550-1944

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Jeff Jackson

American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Nick Jacobs

BA, University of Mary Washington

American Politics
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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Broadly speaking, I’m interested in researching the development of American institutions, particularly the presidency. Additionally, I’m excited to pursue questions concerning American political thought and how those ideas continue to inform us in solving contemporary political problems.
 

Jeffery A. Jenkins

Professor, Director of Graduate Studies

(Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

American Politics, Political Methodology
(434) 243-4963 S261

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

F 3-5

Tags:Methods: Formal Theory, Methods: Quantitative, Political Development and Democratization, Political Institutions, Representation

Jenkins works at the intersection of mainstream American Politics and American political history. His research focuses on the origins and development of American political institutions, notably congressional and partisan institutions, as well as the use of historical data to test contemporary theories of legislative organization and behavior. His work has been published in such journals as the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, Legislative Studies Quarterly, Electoral Studies, the Journal of Economic History, and Studies in American Political Development. He is currently finishing a manuscript, co-authored with Charles Stewart III (MIT), entitled, Fighting for the Speakership: The House and the Rise of Party Government, which is under contract at Princeton University Press. He is a current editorial board member of Congress & the Presidency and a former editorial board member of Legislative Studies Quarterly

David C. Jordan

Professor Emeritus

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Comparative Politics
(434) 924-3298 S152

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M, W 10-11 & by appt.

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Field: Comparative Government (Latin America); International Relations (Foreign Policies of Latin America). Author of World Politics in Our Time, National-ism in Contemporary Latin America, and Revolutionary Cuba and the End of the Cold War, as well as numerous articles. Served as U.S. Ambassador to Peru, 1984-1986.

Elizabeth Kaknes

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Aycan Katitas

BA, Bogazici University

MA, College of Europe

International Relations
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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My research interests center on the international political economy and quantitative methodology, with a specific focus on foreign direct investment. I am most interested in the issues related to the relations between multinational corporations and host country government policies as well as how the public opinion on multinational corporations shapes the policy outcomes. Currently, my specific research interest mostly involves the rise of restrictive foreign direct investment policies in the USA due to increasing Chinese MNC takeovers of American companies.
 

Colin Kielty


Derek King

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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David E. Klein

Associate Professor; Department Equal Opportunity Advocate

Ph.D., Ohio State

American Politics, Political Methodology
(434) 924-3345 S464

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T 3:30-4:30 and TH 12:45-1:45

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Research interests include appellate court policy making, the psychology of judging, judicial elections, and the bases of political obligation and compliance. Author of Making Law in the United States Courts of Appeals (2002). Contributor to the Journal of Legal Studies, Political Research Quarterly and Law & Society Review.

George Klosko

Henry L. and Grace Doherty Professor

Ph.D., Columbia

Political Theory
(434) 924-3092 S381

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

On Leave

Tags:Analytical Political Theory, History of Political Theory, Democratic Theory, Honors program, Justice and Political Ethics

George Klosko's research interests include contemporary political theory, especially issues in analytical and normative theory, and the history of political thought. He teaches courses in both areas: in the history of political thought, focusing on the liberal tradition and Greek political theory, especially Plato; in contemporary, in specific aspects of liberal theory, including problems of political obligation and the theory of John Rawls and Rawls's critics. His books include: The Development of Plato's Political Theory (Methuen, 1986; Second Edition, Oxford, 2006); The Principle of Fairness and Political Obligation (Rowman and Littlefield, 1992); Political Obligations (Oxford University Press, 2005), and The Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy (Oxford, 2011), which he edited. Political Obligations was awarded the 2007 David and Elaine Spitz Prize by the International Conference for the Study of Political Thought, "for the best book in liberal and/or democratic theory published two years earlier." He has published more than forty articles in Political Science, Philosophy, and Classics journals, including the American Political Science Review, Philosophy and Public Affairs, Ethics, Political Theory, and Classical Quarterly. In addition to continuing to write on issues of political obligation, he is currently working on a critical history of the normative foundations of the American welfare state, as defended by various political actors, over the last 100 years. His book in progress, The Transformation of American Liberalism, is under contract with Oxford University Press.

Lauren Knizner

American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Shoko Kohama

International Relations

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Charles Kromkowski

Visiting Lecturer and Politics & Social Sciences Librarian, University of Virginia Library
S063

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

By appointment

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Jonathan Kropko

Assistant Professor American Politics
(434) 924-4660 S383 Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Office Hours:

W 11-1

Tags:Methods: Quantitative, American Politics

Jonathan Kropko attended Ohio State University, and then received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Carolina in 2011.  He recently completed a postdoctoral research fellowship in applied statistics at Columbia University.  His research involves the development of new statistical techniques to facilitate research in political and the social sciences.  He is currently working on methods to examine historical data, to test theories of voting in U.S. presidential elections, and to handle nonresponse in surveys.  Jonathan will be teaching graduate seminars in quantitative research methodology.

 

Bob Kubinec

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Greg Lannon

BA, American University

 

MA, University of Wisconsin

International Relations
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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I am interested in the inter-relationship of Russian defense policy and diplomacy, and how military priorities and deployments reflect Russia’s interests in the world.  I would like to perform research on former Foreign Minister Andrey Kozyrev’s attempt to formulate and establish a liberal foreign policy in the early 1990s. Though this policy failed to take firm root in the Russian consciousness and was eventually replaced by the more independent Eurasianist vision, many of the issues the Russians struggled with in Primakov’s era are still present today. A comprehensive analysis of the failure of Kozyrev’s vision can help us better understand the context in which Russian foreign policy is made today.

 

Brittany Leach

BA, UT-Dallas

MA, University of Georgia

Political Theory
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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My primary areas of interest are democracy, identity, sovereignty, critical theory, and continental philosophy. Within democratic theory, I am interested in agonism and the role of disagreement in politics and society more generally. I approach the topic of identity through a gendered lens, and I am particularly interested in how gendered identities interact with other identities to produce specific modes of subjectivity and a particular sense of self. This theme about subjectivity also interacts with my interest in sovereignty, as I consider the link between conceptions of individual sovereignty and state sovereignty. My curiosity about sovereignty also manifests in an empirically-oriented interest in transnational activism and contentious politics. Finally, within the fields of critical theory and continental philosophy, I am interested in Nietzsche, Marxism, French poststructuralism, and Italian elitism.
 

David Leblang

J. Wilson Newman Professor of Governance, Department Chair

Ph.D., Vanderbilt

International Relations, Political Methodology
(434) 243-1574 (Gibson) (434) 243-8193 (Miller Center) S281

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

On Leave

Tags:Methods: Quantitative, Political Development and Democratization, Political Economy, Political Institutions

David Leblang is a Chair of the Department of Politics and J. Wilson Newman Professor of Governance at the Miller Center of Public Affairs and Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia. A specialist in political economy, Leblang has served as a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, The Directorate of Finance and Economics of the European Commission, and the Department of Defense. He is co-author of Democratic Politics and Financial Markets: Pricing Politics (2006) and more than thirty journal articles in publications including The American Political Science ReviewThe American Journal of Politics, International Organization, Economics and Politics, and the Journal of International Money and Finance. He has received research support from the National Science Foundation. Leblang has written on the politics of economic growth, the determinants of exchange rate policy, the causes of currency crises and the link between elections and economic expectations. At present he is working on two large projects. The first examines how sending countries "harness" the human and material resources of their diasporas while the second focuses on the politics and policies that constrain the mobility of labor across states and nations.

Shu-Shan Lee

Political Theory

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Jeffrey W. Legro

Taylor Professor of Politics and Vice Provost for Global Affairs

Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

International Relations
(434) 924-3958 (434) 924-6056 S291

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

By appointment

Tags:Comparative Foreign Policy and Strategy, Honors program, International Relations Theory, US Foreign Policy

Jeffrey W. Legro is Taylor Professor of Politics and Vice Provost for Global Affairs at the University of Virginia. A specialist on international relations, Legro is the author of Rethinking the World: Great Power Strategies and International Order (2005) and Cooperation under Fire: Anglo-German Restraint during World War II (1995) and the co-editor (with Melvyn Leffler) of To Lead the World: U.S. Strategy after the Bush Doctrine (2008) and In Uncertain Times: American Foreign Policy after the Berlin Wall and 9/11 (2011). He is a contributor to such volumes as The Culture of National Security (1996), China’s Ascent: Power, Security, and the Future of International Politics (2008); Avoiding Trivia: The Role of Strategic Planning in American Foreign Policy (2009) and International Relations Theory and the Consequences of Unipolarity (2011). He is a co-founder and faculty associate of the Governing America in a Global Era Program at UVA’s Miller Center. Legro chaired the American Political Science Association (APSA) Task Force on U.S. Standing in the World and is past president of APSA’s International History and Politics section. His articles on American foreign policy, international cooperation and conflict, China’s future in world politics, international norms and law, military doctrine and strategy, and the sources of foreign policy and national identity have appeared in Foreign Policy, The American Political Science Review, International Organization, International Security, American Journal of Political Science, European Journal of International Relations, Perspectives on Politics, and Cambridge Review of International Relations. He has been awarded fellowships or grants from the Fulbright Foundation, Council on Foreign Relations, U.S. Institute of Peace, The Ford Foundation, Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation, Institute for the Study of World Politics, and Harvard University’s Olin Institute and Center for Science and International Affairs. Legro received his B.A. from Middlebury College and Ph.D. from UCLA. He previously taught at the University of Minnesota and China Foreign Affairs University in Beijing. In 2011 he was Fulbright-Nehru Senior Researcher at the Institute for Defense and Strategic Analyses in New Delhi.

Verlan Lewis

American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Steven Liao

International Relations

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Tina Long

International Relations

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Rafael (Ralph) Lopez

BS, University of Florida

MA, US Army Command

International Relations
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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I am interested in security studies and international political economy.  Of particular interest are the ways a state nurtures military innovation in technology, doctrine, and organization, to affect their capacity to learn strategically. Additionally, I am interested in the formulation and implementation of grand strategy and its related expressions of national power.  

 

Kenny Lowande

American Politics

Gibson Hall 1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

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Allen Lynch

Professor

Ph.D., Columbia

International Relations
(434) 924-3192 S397

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T TH 11-12:15

Tags:Area: Russia, International Relations and Political Development

His current research interests include Russian foreign policy, Russian politics in comparative perspective, and relationships between international order and political development. In 2006, he received an All-University Teaching Award. Courses offered include: Russian Foreign Policy, Russian Politics, American-Russian Relations, Domestic Politics & American Foreign Policy. Books and monographs include: Vladimir Putin & Russian Statecraft (Potomac Books, 2011); How Russia is—Not--Ruled: Reflections on Russian Political Development (Cambridge University Press, 2005); Does Russia Have a Democratic Future? (Foreign Policy Association, 1997); Europe from the Balkans to the Urals (Oxford University Press/Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, 1996), with Reneo Lukic; The Cold War Is Over—Again (Westview Press, 1992); Political & Military Implications of the “Nuclear Winter” Theory (Institute for East-West Security Studies, 1988); and The Soviet Study of International Relations (Cambridge University Press, 1987), which received the Marshall D. Shulman Award of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies. His articles have appeared in numerous learned journals abroad and in the United States; his works have been translated into Russian, Chinese, French, German, Serbo-Croatian and Polish. In 2008, Mr. Lynch was Visiting Professor at the Center for Russian Studies, East China Normal University, Shanghai; In 2005, he was Visiting Scholar at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris; in 2001, he was Visiting Professor at the JFK Institute for North American Studies, Free University of Berlin as well as Visiting Scholar at the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Auswaertige Politik, Berlin; in 1993-1994, he was Visiting Scholar at the Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Research Institute, Munich; in 1981-1982, he was Albert Gallatin Fellow in International Affairs at the Institut des Hautes Etudes Internationales, Geneva; and in 1980-81 he was Visitor at the Russian Research Center, Harvard University. Between 1993-2006, as Director of the Center for Russian & East European Studies, he raised $1.5 million in Russian and East European Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships & program funds. In 1997, he received the Kleinhans Award for Distinguished Service to the School of Continuing Education. At Virginia, he has held both the White Burkett Miller Chair in Public Policy (1992-94) and the Cummings Memorial Chair in International Affairs (2002-2008). He is an Honorary Fellow of the Foreign Policy Association. Between 1988-2012 he was Executive Vice-President of the Feris Foundation of America, a foundation devoted to doctoral research in international studies, disbursing more than $2 million in international doctoral fellowships during that period. Between 2010-12, he was Director of Research, Center for International Studies at the University.

Christine Mahoney

Assistant Professor of Politics and Public Policy at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State

Comparative Politics
(434) 982-6214 109 Garrett Hall

Garrett Hall

Office Hours:

By appointment

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Christine Mahoney is an Assistant Professor of Politics and Public Policy at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. Her research focuses on advocacy in the United States, the European Union and increasingly, globally, as international, transnational, national and local civil society organizations engage with policymakers at all levels of governance to advocate for solutions to complex problems.   

Her book Brussels vs. the Beltway: Advocacy in the United States and the European Union (Georgetown University Press, 2008) is the first large scale comparative study of lobbying in the US and the EU. She has also published in European Union Politics, the Journal of Public Policy, the Journal of European Public Policy, West European Politics, as well as a number of edited volumes.

Her current research focuses on global advocacy on behalf of the displaced; studying how NGOs and governments at the local, national and global levels attempt to fight for the rights of those who have been forced to flee their home lands due to ethnic and political violence.

Dr. Mahoney was previously an Assistant Professor at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University and the Director of the Center for European Studies and the Maxwell EU Center.

Sharon Marsh


Clifton McCleskey

Professor Emeritus American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Danilo Medeiros

BA & MA, University of Sao Paulo

Comparative Politics
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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My research focuses on party systems and legislative politics in new democracies and multiparty presidential systems, with a particular interest in Executive-Legislative relations in Brazil. I am also interested in constitution-making processes, ideal point estimation, elections and democratic development.
 

Carol Mershon

Professor Comparative Politics, Political Methodology
(434) 924-3192 S463 Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

On Leave

Tags:Methods: Qualitative, Methods: Quantitative, Political Economy, Political Institutions, Representation

My research and teaching focus on the ways that institutions constrain the choices of political actors. I also explore the ways that institutions evolve and change due to actor choice. My early work as a political scientist analyzed leadership and alliances in union organizations. I have studied opinion coalitions in the judicial arena. My first single-authored book (The Costs of Coalition, Stanford 2002) and associated publications examined coalition executives in parliamentary democracies. I am currently engaged in two research projects: one on the causes and consequences of party switching among legislators (funded by the National Science Foundation); and the other, related to the first, on sources of change in democratic party systems. In all of my research, I am interested in how and why elected representatives (in the judicial research, non-elected guardians of the law) form and rupture alliances in efforts to get what they want. While many of my publications concentrate on Western Europe, my teaching and my current research include empirical evidence from the United States, Japan, Russia, and Brazil. For further details on my professional background, see my personal website.

Sidney M. Milkis

White Burkett Miller Professor of Politics

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

American Politics
(434) 924-3037 (434) 924-6052 G025 Miller Center

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Gibson Hall room 253

Office Hours:

M 2-5

Tags:Honors program, Political Development and Democratization, Politics and History

Sidney M. Milkis is the White Burkett Miller Professor of the Department of Politics and Faculty Associate at the Miller Center. He has a B.A. from Muhlenberg College and a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania. His books include: The President and the Parties: The Transformation of the American Party System Since the New Deal (1993); Political Parties and Constitutional Government: Remaking American Democracy (1999); Presidential Greatness (2000), coauthored with Marc Landy; The American Presidency: Origins and Development, 1776-2011 (2011), 6th edition, coauthored with Michael Nelson; and Theodore Roosevelt, the Progressive Party, and the Transformation of American Democracy (2009). He is the co-editor, with Jerome Mileur, of thee volumes on twentieth century political reform: Progressivism and the New Democracy (1999); The New Deal and the Triumph of Liberalism (2002); and The Great Society and the High Tide of Liberalism (2005). His articles on American government and political history have appeared in Perspectives on PoliticsPolitical Science QuarterlyStudies in American Political DevelopmentPS: Political Science and Politics, the Journal of Policy HistoryAntitrust Law Journal, Presidential Studies Quarterly and several edited volumes. In addition to teaching graduate and undergraduate students, he regularly gives public lectures on American politics and participates in programs that teach the political history of the United States to international scholars and high school teachers.

 

Ross Mittiga

Political Theory

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

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Daniel Nagashima

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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David M. O'Brien

Leone Reaves and George W. Spicer Professor of Politics

Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara

American Politics
(434) 924-3474 S282

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T 2-3:30

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David M. O’Brien is the Leone Reaves and George W. Spicer Professor at the University of Virginia. He has been a Judicial Fellow and Research Associate at the Supreme Court of the U.S.; and held Fulbright Teaching and Research Awards at Oxford University, England; the University of Bologna, Italy; and in Japan; as well as was a Visiting Fellow at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York, and a Visiting Professor at Institut d’Etudes Politique Universite Lumiere-Lyon 2. He is currently a commissioner on the U.S.-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Exchange and the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission. He is the author of numerous books and articles, including Storm Center: The Supreme Court in American Politics (8 th ed. W.W. Norton), which received the ABA’s Silver Gavel Award; a two-volume casebook, Constitutional Law and Politics (7 th ed., W.W. Norton); and an annual Supreme Court Watch (W.W. Norton); Animal Sacrifice & Religious Freedom: The Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye v. City of Hialeah (University of Kansas Press), and To Dream of Dreams: Religious Freedom and Constitutional Politics in Postwar Japan (University of Hawaii Press) . In addition, he has edited several books and co-authored others, including Government by the People (22 nd ed., Prentice Hall), Courts and Judicial Policymaking (Prentice-Hall), and Judicial Independence: Critical Perspectives from Around the World ( University of Virginia Press).

Hyun Jin Oh

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Marina Omar

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Dissertation Title: “Parties and non-Partisans: Party formation in Post-Conflict Democracies”

Committee chair: David Waldner Committee members: Carol Mershon, Echeverri-Gent, William Quandt

Dissertation abstract:
Why do politicians in new democracies either form or join parties to run in elections, or instead decide to run as independents? The literature on party formation has emphasized the positive case for political parties as the most effective means of winning elective office, political representation, and solving governance problems. My dissertation investigates the conditions under which relevant elites will refrain from building political parties. Political elites will not invoke party building if they perceive non-partisanship as the more optimal strategy.

Carah Ong Whaley

American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Dissertation Title: Freedom from Fear: National Security Policy and the Building of the Modern Republican Party

Committee Chair: Sidney M. Milkis; Members: Larry J. Sabato, William B. Quandt, Philip D. Zelikow

 

Marc Opper

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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John M. Owen, IV

Taylor Professor of Politics

Ph.D., Harvard

International Relations
(434) 924-3523 S465

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M 3-5

Tags:Honors program, International Relations Theory, Politics and History, Security, US Foreign Policy

John M. Owen IV is Ambassador Henry J. and Mrs. Marion R. Taylor Professor of Politics, and a Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture.  His newest book is Confronting Political Islam: Six Lessons from the West’s Past (Princeton, 2014).  He is author of The Clash of Ideas in World Politics: Transnational Networks, States, and Regime Change, 1510-2010 (Princeton, 2010), and of Liberal Peace, Liberal War: American Politics and International Security (Cornell, 1997), and co-editor of Religion, the Enlightenment, and the New Global Order (Columbia, 2011).  He has published in the European Journal of International Relations, Foreign Affairs, International Organization, Internationale Politik und Gesellschaft, International Security, International Studies Quarterly, National Interest, New York Times, Perspectives on Politics, and a number of edited volumes.  Currently he is working on two research projects:  “Soft Power, America, and the Future of International Order” and “Fifth Columns in Peace and War.”  Owen holds an A.B. from Duke University, an M.P.A. from Princeton University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.  He has held fellowships at Harvard, Stanford, Princeton, and Oxford universities.  His research has been supported by grants from the Mellon, MacArthur, Donchian, Earhart, and Smith Richardson foundations and the Army Research Laboratory.  From July 2011 through June 2014 he was Editor-in-Chief of Security Studies.  He is on the editorial board of that journal and of International Security.

Sonal S. Pandya

Associate Professor, Director of Graduate Placement

Ph.D., Harvard

International Relations
(434) 243-1573 S262

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M 4-6

Tags:Political Behavior and Public Opinion, Political Development and Democratization, Political Economy, Political Institutions

Sonal S. Pandya is Associate Professor of Politics and Director of Graduate Placement. She is a specialist in international political economy and the political economy of economic development. Her current research examines why countries regulate foreign direct investment. Pandya’s dissertation on this topic was awarded the American Political Science Association’s 2009 Mancur Olson Award for the Best Dissertation in Political Economy. Her work has been published in International Organization and International Interactions Prior to joining the UVa faculty she was a post-doctoral fellow at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University.

Nicole Pankiewicz

American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Eric M. Patashnik

Professor of Public Policy and Politics

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

American Politics
(434) 924-0903 200B

Garrett Hall

235 McCormick Road

Office Hours:

By appointment

Tags:Political Institutions, Politics and History, Public Policy

Eric M. Patashnik is Professor of Politics and Public Policy. He is also Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. Patashnik's research on US public policy has focused on health care, social insurance, and fiscal politics. He is currently working on a book (with Alan S.
Gerber) tentatively entitled Unhealthy Politics: Professional Authority, Partisan Polarization, and the Battle over Evidence-Based Medicine). He is the co-editor (with Jeffery A. Jenkins) of Living Legislation: Durability, Change, and the Politics of American Lawmaking (University of Chicago Press, 2012). He is the author of Reforms at Risk: What Happens After Major Policy Changes Are Enacted (Princeton University Press, 2008), which received the Louis Brownlow Book Award. He is also the author of Putting Trust in the US Budget: Federal Trust Funds and the Politics of Commitment (Cambridge University Press, 2000) and co-editor (with Alan S. Gerber) of Promoting the General Welfare: New Perspectives on Government Performance (Brookings Institution Press, 2006). Patashnik's essays have appeared in Political Science Quarterly, Governance, Journal of Health Politics, Policy & Law, Health Affairs, and in many other journals and edited volumes. He has received major research grants from the Robert Wood Johnson and Smith Richardson foundations. Patashnik previously held faculty positions in the UCLA School of Public Affairs and the Yale Department of Political Science. He graduated from the University of Virginia and holds a Ph.D. in political science and an M.P.P. from University of California, Berkeley.

Emily Pears

American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Alex Pennington

BA, SUNY-New Paltz

American Politics
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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My main area of interest is broadly focused on the subject of law, policy and society. The small yet extremely powerful Supreme Court is an intriguing institution that has and continues to change the political landscape of the nation. I want to focus on the influence of outside groups who attempt to use the rule of law as a tool to achieve a political agenda. I would like to further focus on the strategy, resources and tactics of these groups and to evaluate their success. Recent movements to study would be the Tea Party, Occupy Wall Street, the recent immigration movement in Arizona and other state, and the push against the Affordable Care Act.
 

Brenton Peterson

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Abby Post

International Relations

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

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Rachel Potter

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Philip Potter

Assistant Professor International Relations
(434) 982-1043 S466 Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

Office Hours:

W 2-4

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Philip Potter is an Assistant Professor of Politics specializing in foreign policy and international relations. He also conducts research in the area of international terrorism and is the principal investigator for a Department of Defense Minerva Initiative project to map and analyze collaborative relationships between terrorist organizations. Professor Potter has recently published articles in International Organization, The Journal of Politics, International Studies Quarterly, and The Journal of Conflict Resolution. His book War and Democratic Constraint (coauthored with Matthew Baum), will be published by Princeton University Press in Spring 2015. He has been a fellow at Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania and holds degrees from UCLA and McGill University.  

 

Rachel Augustine Potter

Assistant Professor American Politics
(434) 924-3614 S384 Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

Office Hours:

W 2-4

Tags:American Politics; Political Institutions; Public Policy

Rachel Augustine Potter is an Assistant Professor of Politics.  Her research interests include American political institutions, regulation, public policy, public administration, and the influence of separation of powers on bureaucratic decision-making.  Her current book project addresses why some government agencies are successful in the notice-and-comment rulemaking process, while others fail. Her most recent research appears in International Studies Quarterly. 

Dr. Potter received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, where she was the recipient of the Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship. She is also the recipient of the Presidential Management Fellowship, the Robert Bosch Fellowship, as well as a number of research grants and awards including the Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy research grant and the APSA David Naveh Founders Award for the best graduate student paper.  Before becoming a full-time political scientist, she worked for a number of governmental institutions, including the White House Office of Management and Budget, the U.S. Government Accountability Office, and the German Federal Ministry of the Interior.  

Michael Poznansky


William Quandt

Professor Emeritus

Ph.D., MIT

International Relations
(434) 924-7896 S164

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

By appointment

Tags:Area: Middle East, Comparative Foreign Policy and Strategy, Democratic Theory, Political Development and Democratization, Public Policy, Security

William Quandt does research on American Foreign Policy in the Middle East and the Arab-Israeli conflict. His major book in this field is Peace Process: American Diplomacy and the Arab-Israeli Conflict Since 1967, Third Edition (Brookings 2005). Another area of his research has been political development in Middle Eastern countries, especially Algeria, a topic of two of his books, most recently, Between Ballots and Bullets: Algeria's Transition from Authoritarianism (Brookings 1998).  He is currently completing a study on the American role in promoting Israeli-Syrian peace negotiations in the 1990s.

Ruhi Ramazani

Professor Emeritus Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Anand Rao

International Relations

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Dissertation Title:  "Self-Help or Self-Destruction? Immigration Politics in Japan, Germany, and Italy." 

Committee Members: Leonard Schoppa (Chair), John Echeverri-Gent (2nd Reader), Denise Walsh (3rd Reader), and Allison Alexy (Outside Reader, Dept. of Anthropology)"

 

Steven E. Rhoads

Professor Emeritus

Ph.D., Cornell

American Politics
(434) 924-7866 S161

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Tags:Gender, Political Economy, Public Policy

Author of Taking Sex Differences Seriously, Incomparable Worth: Pay Equity Meets the Market, The Economist's View of the World: Government, Markets and Public Policy and Policy Analysis in the Federal Aviation Administration; editor of Valuing Life: Public Policy Dilemmas; and contributor to professional journals. Recipient of Bradley, Earhart, Olin, National Endowment for the Humanities and Sloan fellowships. Currently conducting research on gender, especially the effect of sex differences on policy and culture, and on political economy with a view to writing a new edition of The Economist's View of the World.

Russell Riley

Associate Professor and Chair of the Miller Center's Presidential Oral History Program American Politics
(434) 982-2740 Miller Center

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

By appointment

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Riley is an associate professor and chair of the Miller Center's Presidential Oral History Program. He currently heads the Clinton Presidential History Project, a comprehensive effort to conduct and compile scholarly oral history interviews with the senior members of the Clinton White House, as well as other important political figures of the Clinton era. He has also participated in similar efforts to document the presidencies of Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and George H.W. Bush. Riley has taught a wide range of courses in American politics. He is the author of the book The Presidency and the Politics of Racial Inequality: Nation-keeping from 1831–1965, a comparative study of how presidents dealt with abolitionism and the later movement for black civil rights. His other published works include articles on race and politics, presidential leadership, Southern politics, and political parties. He is currently working on a book about post-war politics in the United States, examining comparatively the immediate aftermaths of the Civil War, World Wars I and II, and the Cold War. He also is interested in U.S.-European relations, and was for several years a resident academic program director with the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies, in Austria.

Professor Riley's specialties: American Government and Politics; Presidential Leadership and Presidential Power; the Clinton Presidency; Presidential-Congressional Relations; Executive Branch Politics; U.S. Political History; Wartime and Post-wartime Politics; Political Parties; Oral History; U.S. Public Diplomacy

Jeremiah Rozman

BA, University of Vermont

International Relations
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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My research interests include:  Security and strategic studies, the politics of resource and trade/shipping route security, global counterterrorism and counter insurgency, Middle East politics and the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the role of governmental messages and media approach/framing during the build up to a war deemed necessary or unavoidable.
 

Jennifer Rubenstein

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., University of Chicago

Political Theory
(434) 243-1572 S391

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

W 1-2:30

Tags:Analytical Political Theory, Democratic Theory, Justice and Political Ethics, NGOs and Civil Society, Representation

Jennifer Rubenstein is an assistant professor of politics at the University of Virginia specializing in political theory. Her interests include the political role and ethical responsibilities of non-governmental organizations; global justice; non-ideal theory; democratic theory (especially theories of non-electoral representation and advocacy that attend to global inequalities); theories of office, and the role of imagination and experience in politics. She has published or forthcoming articles in Journal of Politics, Journal of Political Philosophy, Journal of Social Philosophy, and the British Journal of Political Science, as well as chapters in several edited volumes. She is currently finishing a book manuscript about the political ethics of international non-governmental humanitarian organizations, entitled Between Samaritans and States: the Political Ethics of Humanitarian INGOs. Before coming to UVa she was the Cotsen-Link post-doctoral fellow in the Society of Fellows at Princeton University. She received her PhD from the University of Chicago.

Larry J. Sabato

Professor

Ph.D., Oxford

American Politics
(434) 243-8472 S183

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

By Appointment only.  Please contact timrobinson@virginia.edu

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“Politics is a good thing!” … is the slogan of Dr. Larry J. Sabato. The author of over 20 books and countless essays on politics, Dr. Sabato has also served on many national and state commissions, and is the recipient of more than two-dozen major scholarships, grants, and academic awards. Dr. Sabato teaches courses in American politics including Introduction to American Politics and Campaigns and Elections.

At the University of Virginia Center for Politics (www.centerforpolitics.org), founded in 1998, Dr. Sabato brings his years of academic study together with an equally long career as both a political practitioner and commentator on local, state and national elections. The Center represents Dr. Sabato’s mission: to improve civic education and the political process, and in doing so make government more relevant, more accessible, and more meaningful for the average American. His latest projects include The Year of Obama: How Barack Obama Won the White House, and “Sabato’s Crystal Ball,” a website dedicated to the analysis and prediction of the upcoming Governor, House, Senate, and Presidential races (www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball).

Lynn M. Sanders

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of Michigan

American Politics, Political Methodology
(434) 924-3613 S265

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M 3:30-4:30

Tags:Gender, Honors program, Methods: Experimental, Political Behavior and Public Opinion, Political Psychology, Race and Ethnicity

Field: American Government (Public Opinion, Racial and Gender Politics, Democratic Theory). Current research, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, focuses on the influence of political participation on mental health. A book manuscript in progress examines how the methodological assumptions of survey researchers have shaped Americans' understandings of public opinion on race. Contributor to journals including Philosophy of the Social Sciences, Political Theory, American Journal of Sociology, and to Divided by Color (with Donald Kinder, 1996).

James D. Savage

Professor

(Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley)

American Politics, Comparative Politics
(434) 924-3750 S483

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T 2-3:30

Tags:American Political Thought, Area: Europe, Political Development and Democratization, Political Economy, Politics and History, Public Policy

Author of Reconstructing Iraq’s Budgetary Institutions:  Coalition State Building after Saddam (Cambridge University Press, 2013); Making the EMU: The Politics of Budgetary Surveillance and The Enforcement of Maastricht (Oxford University Press, 2007); Funding Science in America: Congress, Universities, and the Politics of the Academic Pork Barrel (Cambridge University Press, 2000); and Balanced Budgets and American Politics (Cornell University Press, 1990). Articles appearing in such journals as the Journal of Politics, Review of International Political Economy, Legislative Studies Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, and Public Administration Review.  Recipient of the American Political Science Association's Harold D. Lasswell dissertation prize, an Olin-Bradley post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard University, a Council on Foreign Relations-Hitachi International Affairs fellowship, a Fulbright-European Union Affairs fellowship, and other fellowships and awards.  Recipient of the 2013 Aaron B. Wildavsky Award for Lifetime Scholarly Achievement in budgeting and public financial management.   

 

My research and teaching focus on comparative budgetary, fiscal, and macroeconomic policy, with an emphasis on the United States, the European Union, Iraq, and Japan. I am particularly interested in the development of macrobudgetary rules, procedures, and institutions in these countries, and how they influence fiscal outcomes.  My research on the EU includes a study of the Maastricht Treaty and the Stability and Growth Pact.  Research for the book was conducted as a Fulbright-European Union Affairs fellow affiliated with the European Commission.  My studies of the development of Japanese budgetary procedures and policy stem from research conducted at the Japanese Ministry of Finance as a Council of Foreign Relations-Hitachi International Affairs Fellow.  My most recent book explores the American-led Coalition’s reconstruction of Iraq’s budgetary system after the fall of Saddam Hussein.  I am currently completing projects on budgetary statebuilding in Afghanistan and the rise of new fiscal rules in the European Union in the wake of financial crisis. 

 

My service to the University includes serving as Executive Assistant to the President for Federal Relations, Assistant Vice President for Research and Federal Relations, and Director, Masters of Administration and Mid-Career Programs.

William Sbach


Leonard Schoppa

Professor, Associate Dean for the College

Ph.D., Oxford

Comparative Politics
(434) 924-3211 S461

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T 2:30-3:30 in Cabell 536

Tags:Area: Asia, Political Economy, Political Institutions, Public Policy

My research examines the politics and foreign relations of Japan.  I am currently working on two projects, an edited volume titled The Evolution of Japanese Party Politics (Toronto University Press, forthcoming) and a co-authored book on International Relations Theory and East Asia (Columbia University Press, forthcoming, with David Kang and Ming Wan).  The first project explains how and why Japan has seen one of the two major parties in its party system shrink to fringe-party size and be replaced by a brand new party, the Democratic Party of Japan.  Such major changes in the typically “frozen” party systems of advanced industrialized democracies are rare, so Japan’s experience sheds light on the forces that can disrupt such established systems.

The second project looks back at the major developments in East Asia’s foreign relations over the past century and assesses the degree to which various IR theories can explain these developments.  This assessment of how IR theory conforms to the region’s actual experience serves as a basis for thinking about how theory should inform strategies for maintaining peace and stability in the region in the years ahead.

Three previous sole-authored books have focused on the forces shaping social and economic policy in Japan.  These include Race for the Exits: The Unraveling of Japan’s System of Social Protection, (Cornell University Press, 2006), analyzing why Japan has been slow to modify policies and structures that have caused manufacturers to “exit” Japan via foreign direct investment and women to “exit” via decisions not to have children or not to continue in careers; Bargaining With Japan: What American Pressure Can and Cannot Do (Columbia, 1997), which examines the role played by foreign pressure in Japanese economic policymaking; and Education Reform in Japan (Routledge, 1991). Refereed articles growing out of these projects have been published in International Organization, Comparative Political Studies, the Journal of European Social Policy and the Journal of Japanese Studies (1991).

Jonah Schulhofer-Wohl

Assistant Professor Comparative Politics, International Relations
434 924-3936

S283 Gibson Hall 1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Office Hours:

M 2-3 and W 10-11

Tags:Area: Middle East, Political Economy, Security

Jonah Schulhofer-Wohl is Assistant Professor of Politics. He is a specialist on civil wars with a focus on politics and development in the Middle East. His research examines the conduct of civil wars and the effect of external assistance on the dynamics of conflict using a combination of game-theoretic analysis, interviews with former commanders who participated in the civil war in Lebanon from 1975-1990, cross-country statistical evidence, and focused comparisons of other civil wars. Prior to joining the UVa faculty he was a fellow in regional political economy at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University. Recent publications include “Parochialism as a Central Challenge in Counterinsurgency” (May 2012; with Nicholas Sambanis and Moses Shayo) Science 336(6038): 805-808.

Herman Schwartz

Professor

Ph.D., Cornell

International Relations
(434) 924-7818 S497

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T TH 10:50-12:00

Tags:Political Development and Democratization, Political Economy, Political Institutions, Public Policy, US Foreign Policy

Herman Schwartz is a geographically oriented economic historian who finds it congenial to work in a politics department because he studies the constitution of and interaction of state and market power.  He has worked on foreign debt financed, agricultural export led economic development in the 19th century; the development of the global economy since 1500; marketization of the welfare state in the 1980s and 1990s; and the global causes and consequences of the American housing bubble.  He is currently working on the political economy of the knowledge economy.

Matt Scroggs


Todd S. Sechser

Associate Professor

Ph.D., Stanford

International Relations, Political Methodology
(434) 924-6993 S284

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M 1:30-3

Tags:International Relations Theory, Methods: Quantitative, Security

Todd S. Sechser (Ph.D., Stanford, 2007) is Associate Professor of Politics specializing in questions of international security.  His research interests include military coercion, reputations in international relations, the strategic effects of nuclear weapons, and the sources and consequences of military doctrine. Sechser's work has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, and the Journal of Conflict Resolution.  His dissertation won the 2008 Walter Isard Award for the best dissertation in peace science. Sechser has held research fellowships at the Center for International Security and Cooperation (Stanford), the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (Harvard), and the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies (Harvard).  In 2011-12 he was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Sue Sherrill

Administrative Supervisor
(434) 924-6990 S183

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Classified staff supervisor; oversees Department matters relating to human resources, department payroll, faculty allowances, financial reconciliations of department accounts and grants, purchasing.

Paul S. Shoup

Professor Emeritus Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Jennifer Simons

BA, Stanford University

Comparative Politics
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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I am interested in the development of identity politics in avowedly pluralist, secular states (particularly Israel, Turkey and India) - what has caused the populations of these states, which were founded upon ideals of pluralism and tolerance, to return to a seemingly more primordial approach to politics based on clan-like allegiances? How has this shift changed the relationship between state and citizen and the nature of local democracy? And finally, how has this shift changed these states’ foreign affairs and the ways in which they are perceived by other members of the international community? Similarly, I am interested in universal conceptions of human rights and the politics of cultural relativity. As peoples and states have moved closer together through globalization, how have local cultures and particularities politically mobilized to combat the seemingly Western encroachment of human rights norms?
 

Michael Joseph Smith

Thomas C. Sorenson Professor of Political and Social Thought and Associate Professor of Politics

Ph.D., Oxford

International Relations
(434) 982-2235 S396

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Tags:Human Rights, Justice and Political Ethics

Michael Joseph Smith is the Thomas C. Sorenson Professor of Political and Social Thought and Associate Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia. He grew up in Yonkers, New York, where he attended public schools. He was an undergraduate at Harvard University, receiving his B.A. in 1973. He was then awarded a British Government Marshall Scholarship to Oxford University and received a Master of Philosophy degree from Oxford in 1976. After serving as a Lecturer in Politics at Merton College, Oxford for two years, he returned to Harvard for his Ph.D., which he received in 1982. He then taught as an Assistant Professor of Government and Social Studies at Harvard, and came to the University of Virginia in 1986.

At Virginia he currently directs the interdisciplinary, undergraduate Program in Political and Social Thought, and from 1994-99 he directed the Politics Department's Distinguished Majors program. He teaches courses on human rights, political thought, and on ethics and international relations; from 1988-99 he also taught in the Politics Honors program. In 1995, Professor Smith led a National Endowment for the Humanities seminar for college professors on Teaching Ethics and International Relations. He won the All-University Teaching Award in 2002. He also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs in New York. In 2002-03, Prof. Smith was elected Chair of the University of Virginia Faculty Senate, and in 2003-04, President Casteen appointed him to co-chair the President's Commission on Diversity and Equity.

Professor Smith is the author of Realist Thought from Weber to Kissinger (LSU, 1987) and co-author and co-editor (with Linda B. Miller) of Ideas and Ideals (Westview, 1992). He has also written extensively on the ethical dilemmas raised by contemporary international politics, most recently contributing to the United Nations International Commission on Sovereignty and Intervention. With Stanley Hoffmann of Harvard University he is working on a long-term book project about human rights and the ethical dilemmas of modern international relations.

Anthony Sparacino

BA, Manhattan College

MA, CUNY-Graduate Center

American Politics
Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

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I am interested in right-wing politics with regard to American political development. Particular questions I wish to focus on in my future research include: What does the label “conservative,” a term which is thrown around frequently carrying a number of specific and not always flattering connotations, really mean in current discourse and how has it changed over time? How has the Republican Party, the party of Lincoln, evolved over time to represent such varied, and sometimes competing, interests as the Christian Right, big business, and anti-immigration activists? What is the relationship between right-wing ideology and popular culture?
 

Emily Sydnor

American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Dissertation title: Engaging the "Enemy:" The Political Interaction of Incivilty and Conflict Orientation

Committee: Nick Winter (co-chair), Paul Freedman (co-chair), Lynn Sanders, Brian Nosek (Psychology)

Vivian E. Thomson

Associate Professor, Environmental Sciences and Politics American Politics
(434) 924-3964 253 Clark Hall

Office Hours:

W 12-2 in Clark Hall 253

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Associate Professor Vivian E. Thomson teaches in the Department of Environmental Sciences and the Department of Politics. Her professional specialty is environmental policy and politics. In 2001 she helped to create--and she now directs--the Environmental Thought and Practice BA program, one of the University's most popular interdisciplinary undergraduate degree programs. She also directs the University's Panama Initiative, which was launched in 2007 by President Casteen, Provost Garson, and Vice Provost Grossman.

Professor Thomson's work extends outside of the University into the realm of environmental policy in practice. She was appointed by Governors Warner and Kaine in in 2002 and in 2006, respectively, to the State Air Pollution Control Board, the seven-member body that makes air pollution policy for the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Her environmental policy writings include greenhouse gas emissions, energy, air pollution, and waste management. She is recognized for her international work. She has participated in international meetings on the subjects of trash management and greenhouse gas emissions trading, respectively.

During academic year 2001-2002 Professor Thomson was Fulbright Professor of American Studies at the University of Southern Denmark, Odense, where she taught American politics and environmental policy.

In 2005-2006 Professor Thomson was Guest Scholar at the Pew Center on Global Climate Change.

Professor Thomson's book, Garbage In, Garbage Out: Solving the Problems with Long-Distance Trash Transport, is now in print (University of Virginia Press, 2009). This work examines interstate trash transport in the United States within a broad social, economic, and cultural context that includes comparisons with practices in the EU and Japan.

Professor Thomson's book was Finalist in the 2010 Phillip D. Reed Writing Competition of the Southern Environmental Law Center.  Her book has been featured in several public radio interviews, most recently on 27 January 2011 on the national program MarketPlace. Professor Thomson's work in the US and in Panama was featured in the Winter 2010 UVa Alumni Magazine.

Charlee Tidrick


Claire Timperley

Political Theory

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Dissertation Title: Indigeneity: The Politics and Ethics of a Concept
Committee: Lawrie Balfour (Chair), Colin Bird, Jennifer Rubenstein, Denise Walsh

 

Yuri Urbanovich

Visiting Lecturer Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Craig Volden

Professor of Public Policy and Politics, Frank Batten School of Leadership & Public Policy

Ph.D. Stanford University

American Politics, Political Methodology
434-243-3725
Office Hours:

W 3-4

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Volden studies the interaction among political institutions, including issues in legislative-executive behavior and federalism. His research areas include American political institutions, positive political economy, legislative politics, state and local politics, methods, and formal theory. Before joining the Batten School, he taught at the Ohio State University, the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago, and Claremont Graduate University. His major work, Revolving Gridlock, co-authored with David Brady, explores the conditions under which members of Congress are able to overcome the constraints that frequently produce policy gridlock. He works extensively on issues of policy diffusion, assessing conditions under which effective policies spread across states and localities. His current project focuses on congressional leadership and the comparative legislative effectiveness of individual members of Congress. He earned his PhD in political economy from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business.

Veronica Vos

Comparative Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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David Waldner

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Comparative Politics, Political Methodology
(434) 924-6931 S263

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M 1-3

Tags:Political Economy, Political Institutions

My teaching and research begin with investigation into the causes of different forms of state formation and the consequences of variations in state-building trajectories for economic development and democratization. Although I began my professional career as a specialist in Middle East politics, my current work includes material from Latin America, Africa, and Asia, as well. My empirical work raises questions about theory and method, questions that I explore in courses and papers about theories of comparative politics, qualitative methods, and the philosophy of science. My first book is State Building and Late Development. My two current book projects are Democracy and Dictatorship in the Post-Colonial World and The Philosophy of Social Science Methods. Recent papers include “Anti Anti-Determinism,” “On the Non-Institutional Origins of the Institutional Origins of Capitalism,” and “Inferences and Explanations at the K/T Boundary… and Beyond.” I regularly teach three graduate seminars: Qualitative Methods, Political Development, and Origins of Democracy and Dictatorship. For undergraduates, I teach Introduction to Comparative Politicss, Theories of Democracy and Dictatorship, and the Distinguished Majors Seminar.

Denise Walsh

Associate Professor of Politics and Women, Gender & Sexuality

Ph.D., New School for Social Research

Comparative Politics
(434) 982-2131 S454

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

T 3:30-5:30

Tags:Area: Africa, Democratic Theory, Gender, Human Rights, NGOs and Civil Society, Political Development and Democratization, Political Institutions, Public Policy, Race and Ethnicity

Denise Walsh (PhD, New School for Social Research) is Associate Professor of Politics and Women, Gender & Sexuality. Her research focuses on how liberal democracies can become more inclusive and just. Walsh’s current book project is on multiculturalism and women's rights in Canada and South Africa. She is also collaborating with Carol Mershon to develop new strategies for diversifying and addressing bias in the social sciences. Walsh’s first book, Women’s Rights in Democratizing States (Cambridge University Press, 2010), reveals the ways that democratic institutions obstruct advances in women’s rights. Her recent publications include "Does the Quality of Democracy Matter for Women's Rights?" in Comparative Political Studies, and “A Feminist Approach to Quotas and Comparative Politics” in Politics & Gender. Walsh’s research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Collegio Carlo Alberto in Italy, the Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth College, and numerous organizations at the University of Virginia. Walsh won the Best Dissertation Prize from the Women in Politics Research Section of the American Political Science Association in 2007. She received an all-University Teaching Award in 2014. Walsh teaches courses on democratic theory and democratic practice, identity and the state, gender politics in the Global South and in Africa, culture and human rights, and gender-based violence.

Yaping Wang

International Relations

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Alex Welch

American Politics

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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Stephen K. White

James Hart Professor

Ph.D., City University of New York

Political Theory
(434) 924-3681 S453

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M 2:15-3:15 and W 2-3:30

Tags:Continental Political Thought, Democratic Theory, Methods: Qualitative

The former editor of the journal, Political Theory, his research interests include critical social and political theory, philosophy of social science, and continental political thought. He teaches courses in the history of political thought, contemporary political theory, and the philosophy of social science. Research grants include Fulbright, American Council of Learned Societies, National Endowment for the Humanities, Alexander Von Humboldt, and Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst. He has been a visiting scholar or professor at University of Konstanz , Goethe University, Frankfurt, and Erasmus University, Rotterdam. Recent books and projects include A Democratic Bearing (Book ms); The Ethos of a Late-Modern Citizen (Harvard Univ. Pr., 2009), and Sustaining Affirmation: The Strengths of Weak Ontology in Political Theory (Princeton Univ. Pr., 2000). An Edited Volume (With J. Donald Moon), What is Political Theory? appeared with Sage Publications in 2004. Older books include The Recent Work of Jurgen Habermas (Cambridge University Press, 1988; Portuguese translation by Icone, 1996) and Political Theory and Postmodernism (Cambridge University Press, 1991; Japanese translation by Showado, 1996; Chinese translation by Liaoning, 2004); Edmund Burke: Modernity, Politics and Aesthetics ( Sage Publications, 1994; second edition in 2002 from Roman and Littlefield). Edited volumes include, Lifeworld and Politics: Between Modernity and Postmodernity (University of Notre Dame Press, 1989) and Cambridge Companion to Habermas (Cambridge University Press, 1995). Recent essays include: “The Virtual Patriot Syndrome: Tea Partyers and others,” (forthcoming);“’No Saying’ in Habermas,” in Political Theory (Feb. 2012)“Fullness and Dearth: Depth Experience and Democratic Life,” in the American Political Science Review (Nov. 2010); “Violence, Metaphysics, and Weak Ontology” in Political Theory (Dec. 2009)“ A Late-Modern Ethos and the Democratic Predicament,” in Democracy and Pluralism (Routledge 2009); “Reason and the Ethos of a Late-Modern Citizen,” in Contemporary Debates in Political Philosophy (Blackwells 2009). "Uncertain Constellations: Dignity, Equality, Respect and ......?" in The New Pluralism ( Duke Univ. Pr., 2008); “Weak Ontology: Genealogy and Critical Issues,” The Hedgehog Review Special Issue: “Commitments in a Post-Foundationalist World: Exploring the Possibilities of‘Weak Ontology’(Summer 2005); "After Critique: Subjectivity in Contemporary Political Theory", European Journal of Political Theory (2004); "The Very Idea of A Critical Social Science", in Cambridge Companion To Critical Theory ( Cambridge Univ. Pr., 2004); “Three Conceptions of the Political: The Real World of Late Modern Democracy,” in A. Botwinick and W. Connolly, eds., Democracy and Vision (Princeton Univ. Pr., 2001);“Skeptics at the Celebration: Civil Society and the Early Frankfurt School,” in N. Rosenblum and R. Post, eds., Civil Society and Government (Princeton Univ. Pr., 2001).

Nicholas J. G. Winter

 

Assistant Professor. Fields: American politics (public opinion, political psychology, gender & politics, race & politics) and methodology (statistical analysis, research design, experimental methods).

Winter's recent book develops and tests a theory to explain the process by which public opinion can be shaped by implicit race or gender considerations (Dangerous Frames: How Ideas About Race and Gender Shape Public Opinion, University of Chicago Press). He has a project underway exploring the ways that ideas about gender and masculinity shape perceptions of political leaders, parties and issues throughout American history. His work has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, Gender & Politics, Political Behavior, and Political Psychology.

Brantly Womack

Professor

Ph.D., University of Chicago

Comparative Politics
(434) 924-7008 S484

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

Office Hours:

M 3-4 and W 2-3

Tags:Area: Asia, Comparative Foreign Policy and Strategy, International Relations Theory, Political Development and Democratization, Security

Author of China among Unequals: Asymmetric Foreign Relations in Asia (2010); China and Vietnam: The Politics of Asymmetry (2006); Foundations of Mao Zedong's Political Thought, 1917-1935; co-author of Politics in China (3rd ed.); editor of China’s Rise in Historical Perspective (2010); Contemporary Chinese Politics in Historical Perspective, Media and the Chinese Public; Electoral Reform in China; author of more than one hundred journal articles and book chapters on Asian politics, including articles in World Politics, World Policy Journal, China Quarterly, Pacific Affairs, and China Journal. Fulbright Scholar, Woodrow Wilson Fellow, Mellon Fellow; recipient of numerous research grants. Honorary professor at Jilin University (Changchun, China), and at East China Normal University (Shanghai, China). Current research interests include asymmetric international relationships, the relationship of public authority and popular power in China; provincial diversification in China; domestic politics and foreign policy of Vietnam; China's relations with Southeast Asia.

Yu Jin Woo


Meredith Woo

Professor

Ph.D., Columbia

Comparative Politics
(434) 924-4611 Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22904

Office Hours:

On Leave

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Meredith Woo has served as the dean of the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences since June 2008. She came to the University of Virginia from the University of Michigan, where she served most recently as professor of political science and associate dean for the social sciences in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Prior to her eight years on the Michigan faculty, she taught for 12 years at Northwestern University, where she helped rebuild the department of political science and co-founded the Center for International and Comparative Studies.

An expert on international political economy and East Asian politics, she has written and edited seven books, and was the executive producer of an award-winning documentary film about Stalin’s ethnic cleansing of Koreans living in Russia during the Great Terror.

A native of Seoul who was educated in Seoul and Tokyo through high school, she came to the United States to study at Bowdoin College in Maine. She completed her master’s and doctoral degrees in international affairs, Latin American studies, and political science at Columbia University.

Theo Yakah


Jingcai Ying

Political Theory

Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave (JPA)

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J. Warren York