Stephen K. White

Stephen WhiteThe former editor of the journal, Political Theory, his research interests include critical social and political theory, philosophy of social science, and continental political thought. He teaches courses in the history of political thought, contemporary political theory, and the philosophy of social science.

Research grants include Fulbright, American Council of Learned Societies, National Endowment for the Humanities, Alexander Von Humboldt, and Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst. He has been a visiting scholar or professor at University of Konstanz, Goethe University, Frankfurt, and Erasmus University, Rotterdam.

Recent books and projects include: A Democratic Bearing: Admirable Citizens, Uneven Injustice and Critical Theory (forthcoming); The Ethos of a Late-Modern Citizen (Harvard, 2009), and Sustaining Affirmation: The Strengths of Weak Ontology in Political Theory (Princeton, 2001). An Edited Volume (With J. Donald Moon), What is Political Theory? (Sage 2004). Older books include The Recent Work of Jürgen Habermas (Cambridge, 1988; Portuguese trans. by Icone, 1996) and Political Theory and Postmodernism (Cambridge, 1991; Japanese trans by Showado, 1996; Chinese trans. by Liaoning, 2004); Edmund Burke: Modernity, Politics and Aesthetics ( Sage, 1994; 2nd ed. in 2002, Roman and Littlefield). Edited volumes include, Lifeworld and Politics: Between Modernity and Postmodernity (University of Notre Dame Press, 1989) and Cambridge Companion to Habermas (Cambridge University Press, 1995).

Stephen WhiteRecent essays include: “A More Democratic Bearing: Re-envisioning the Sensibility and Script of the Middle Class,” Political Theory (forthcoming); “Continental and Analytic Lenses in Relation to the Communicative Action Paradigm: Reconstructive Thoughts,” European Journal of Political Theory (forthcoming) “The Virtual Patriot Syndrome: Tea Partyers and Others,” in Radical Futures Past (Kentucky, 2014); “’No Saying’ in Habermas,” in Political Theory (Feb. 2012); “Fullness and Dearth: Depth Experience and Democratic Life,” in the American Political Science Review (Nov. 2010); “Violence, Metaphysics, and Weak Ontology” in Political Theory (Dec. 2009)“ A Late-Modern Ethos and the Democratic Predicament,” in Democracy and Pluralism (Routledge, 2009); “Reason and the Ethos of a Late-Modern Citizen,” in Contemporary Debates in Political Philosophy (Blackwell, 2009). “Uncertain Constellations: Dignity, Equality, Respect and ……?” in The New Pluralism (Duke Univ. Pr., 2008); “Weak Ontology: Genealogy and Critical Issues,” The Hedgehog Review Special Issue: “Commitments in a Post-Foundationalist World: Exploring the Possibilities of ‘Weak Ontology’ (Summer 2005).

Professor


Email
 skw2n@virginia.edu
Phone
(434) 924-3681
Office
S453 Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave
Office Hours
M 2:15 – 3:15; and Weds. 2-3:30
Education
Ph.D. Political Science, City University of New York